Bioinformatics Resource for Invertebrate Vectors of Human Pathogens
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Geneset Aedes aegypti AaegL5.1 transcripts
Description LVP_AGWG strain AaegL5.1 geneset.
Accessions
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Experiments
Name Description
Resistance to Bti Cry toxins (Stalinski et al., 2016) Resistance to Bti Cry toxins, Cry4A, Cry4B, Cry11A in Aedes aegypti.
Larval and adult Malpighian tubules (Li et al., 2017) RNA-seq comparison of larval and adult Aedes aegypti Malpighian tubules to compare renal function.
Blood fed vs. Sugar Fed (Bonizzoni et al., 2011) Transcript expression was compared between sugar-fed and blood-fed 3-5 day old female Aedes aegypti to find genome-wide changes in expression following a blood meal. GEO: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE24872
Insecticide and Bti-resistant strains (David et al., 2014) RNA-seq comparison of Aedes Aegypti strains obtained by selection on the Bora-Bora strain with insecticides imidacloprid, permethrin and propoxur and two further strains, LiToX_N and LiToX_S that were selected for resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis, with normal and slow growth characteristics respectively.
Mosquito-microsporidia interactions (Desjardins et al., 2015) RNA-Seq of Aedes aegypti Orlando strains infected with Edhazardia aedis in the mosquito larval, adult and larval progeny life stages.
Brugia malayi infection in susceptible and resistant strains (Juneja et al., 2015) Brugia malayi infection in resistant and susceptible genotypes of the Liverpool Aedes aegypti strains at three timepoints.
Forest vs. domestic form females (McBride et al., 2014) Antennal transcript expression was compared between domestic (human-preferring) and forest (animal-preferring) female Aedes aegypti colonies to investigate the underlying genetics of prey preference. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject/PRJNA233429
Human vs. guinea pig preferring females (McBride et al., 2014) Antennal transcript expression was compared between human-preferring and animal (guinea pig)-preferring female Aedes aegypti F2 hybrids crossed from forest and domestic colonies to investigate the underlying genetics of prey preference. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject/PRJNA233429
Pyrethroid resistant strains (Faucon et al., 2017) Pyrethroid resistance in various Aedes aegypti strains.
Embryonic development (Hall et al., 2015) Transcriptome of Aedes aegypti Liverpool embryos at 2-4hr, 4-8hr and 8-12hr time points.
Aedes aegypti male vs female (Hall et al., 2015) Male and female in Aedes aegypti transcriptomes to investigate sex-biased gene chromosomal distribution patterns.
Larval midgut response to Cry11Aa toxin (Canton et al., 2015) Time series of Aedes aegypti larvae exposed to LC50 of Cry11Aa toxin.
Brugia malayi infection, blood-feeding time-series, Liverpool strain (Choi et al., 2014) Thoracic tissues of the Liverpool Aedes aegypti strains were collected for eight consecutive days after blood meals infected with Brugia malayi and uninfected blood meals.
Brugia malayi infection, blood-feeding time-series, RED strain (Choi et al., 2014) Thoracic tissues of the RED Aedes aegypti mosquitoes were collected for four consecutive days after blood meals infected with Brugia malayi and uninfected blood meals.
Responses of the mosquito to the Zika Virus infection (Etebari et al., 2017) Response of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes to Zika Virus infection at 2, 7 and 14 days post-infection.
Zika and Dengue virus infections (Anglero-Rodriguez et al., 2017) Aedes aegypti infected with the Zika virus (ZIKV) or the Dengue virus (DENV2) to study molecular responses to infection.
Dengue virus infections (Suzuki et al., 2017) Aedes aegypti mosquitoes infected with the wild-type isolates of either DENV1 (KDH0030A) or DENV3 (GabonMDA2010) to study endogenous viral elements.
Blood meals infected with Dengue virus 1 (Raquin et al., 2017) Aedes aegypti mosquitoes were infected or uninfected with the Dengue virus 1 through blood meals, midguts extracted 24 and 96 hours post infection to investigate candidate host factors modulating DENV replication.